One Future Collective is an organization that works towards building compassionate youth social leadership through the use of art, education, community intervention and policy advocacy – across verticals of gender justice, mental health, legal reform and development policy.

Mumbai, India
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An Introduction to The Women’s Sexual, Reproductive, and Menstrual Rights Bill, 2018

Parliamentarian Shashi Tharoor’s 2018 bill on the restoration of the sexual, reproductive and menstrual rights of women creates a space at the table for a conversation which has so far only been confined to the more liberal mindsets of the country. By putting forth a bill which crystallizes women’s agency and independence in a positive sense, the questions plaguing women’s emancipation shift from an abstract sort of in-the-air discussion about their theoretical rights,...

The Mala Araya Community’s Claim to Sabarimala

On the 28th of September, 2018, a five-judge bench of the Supreme Court declared in a landmark judgement, that women of all ages would be allowed into the Sabarimala Temple in Kerala’s Pathanamthitta district. It officially lifted the ban, that was instilled in 1955, against menstruating girls and women. As discussions escalated, with conversations surrounding the court’s decision to break religious tradition and how this was a win for women rights and empowerment,...

One Future Inspire | Richa Vashista: Gender, Mental Health and Advocacy

One Future Inspire is a series of interviews with young people across countries, borders, spectrums of work and being. These people share a common quality — they inspire us. Our aim is to bring their work to the fore with the hope that it might ignite a spark in someone, somewhere.

Team One Future interviewed Richa Vashista, an ardent gender rights activist and a mental health specialist.

The Masculinity Myth and What It Is Doing to Us

The sitcom FRIENDS very subtly highlighted a question that has always bothered me, why do men not share their feelings even with their closest friends? However, it’s not that they don’t share their feelings, it’s how they share their feelings. No person is the same and thus every person, whether male of female, will always have a different way of expressing their emotions. Research however shows that people are often uncomfortable with men...

Why Child Care Leaves Are Just Another Brick in the Proverbial Patriarchal Wall

In the Monsoon Session of the Parliament last year, Mr. Rajeev Satav pushed for the unconventional. A Member of Parliament from Hingoli, Maharashtra, Mr. Satav sought to introduce the Paternity Benefit Bill, 2017, which aimed to ensure gender equality in terms of child care. The Bill was to complement the Maternity Benefit Act, 2016 by filling in the gaps in the latter, and promoting inclusive child care. Mr. Satav had initially observed that the lack of paternal child care leaves reflected the stereotype that child rearing was the woman’s chore to handle. The push for legislating paternity leaves came from a growing consciousness of gender equal parenting which provides a much more holistic upbringing for the child. With private companies opening up to the possibility of longer paternal leaves, the state took the initiative to ensure parental leaves across organized and unorganized sectors.

BookView | The Politics of the Veil by Joan Wallach Scott

“In the end it’s not because of Islam that we stay at home, but because of French society.”

Joan Wallach Scott is an American historian who specializes in Gender and  Intellectual History in France at Princeton University. This testimony reproduced in her book, The Politics of the Veil, sums up the current plight of Muslim women in France. The book aims to discuss the background, justification and the french discourse on the “veil”. It discusses the issue and subsequent ban of the veil in primary schools in regard to the French form of secularism, which is considered to be one of the hallmarks of the French Republic. French secularity, or the policy Laïcité, as it is better known in France, has many interpretations and forms of application.

The Long Road Home from Sabarimala

The month-old Sabarimala judgment given by the Supreme Court of India has opened the floodgates to a massive nationwide conversation on how Indians view women, morality and the normalization of the inherently problematic ways in which we treat both. Whether it is addressing the stigma associated with menstruation, or the parallelism with the #MeToo movement, or taking on the broader aspect of institutionalized gender discrimination, Sabarimala has pulled its fair share of skeletons out of the closet.  However, has the seemingly straightforward verdict in Sabarimala paved the way for something even greater?

Navigating #MeToo in the Horrific Interiors of a Family Whatsapp Group

‘This guy is gonna be in trouble after 10-15 years…@ #METOO…’ the caption to the photo read. Three others on the family whatsapp group had expressed how hilarious the forward was with an assortment of laughing emojis. I was stunned. If someone played the associative word game with me, my instinctive response to the #MeToo movement, would be 'discomfort'. As it should be. The entire process of addressing sexual harassment is a discomfiting one....

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