One Future Collective is an organization that works towards building compassionate youth social leadership through the use of art, education, community intervention and policy advocacy – across verticals of gender justice, mental health, legal reform and development policy.

Mumbai, India
+91 9082301339
info@onefuturecollective.org

Decriminalising Sex Work in India: Steps and Solutions

Sex work in India is problematic to say the least. In signing the International Convention,  the Trafficking Protocol, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights as  well as the Convention for Elimination of All Kinds of Discrimination Against Women, India  has evidenced the legislative motive of the Immoral  Traffic (Prevention)  Act, 1956,  which  does not  expunge sex workers  for their contribution  to the sex trade. Yet it fails to preserve their rights or protect their persons as sex workers continue to remain replaceable pawns in a vicious network of organized crime.

Report | Book Launch of ‘For the Sake of Allah’ by Anwar Aalam

25 February 2019, Mumbai: The launch of For the Sake of Allah: The Origin, Development And Discourse of The Gulen Movement by Anwar Aalam was organised by CSSS and Indialogue Foundation, on 25 February 2019 at. It featured a panel discussion on the book, with Prof. Nasreen, Prof. Ranu Jain, and Hasan Kamal as panelists, and Irfan Engineer as the moderator.

Religion, Orientalism and Gender Based Violence: A Feminist Analysis of the ‘Abused Goddesses’ Print Campaign in India

“Pray that we never see this day. Today, more than 68% of the women in India are victims of domestic violence. Tomorrow, it seems like no woman shall be spared. Not even the ones we pray to.”- With this tagline, the Abused Goddesses campaign sought to curb domestic violence and sex trafficking of Indian women. Led by ad agency Taproot India, for the international non-governmental organization Save Our Sisters, as an initiative of...

The Not so Sanskaari Book Club Meet | Report

'Oh my, this book was such a breather! I so loved it!', exclaimed one of the members. 'I read the entire book crouched on a chair at the Crossword store. I didn't want to take a copy home lest my mother get uncomfortable and shoot questions at me, so much for bookstores being the current cyber cafes!' shares another. The latest Sanskaari Girls Book Club Meet happened on the 18th of November, 2018...

The Long Road Home from Sabarimala

The month-old Sabarimala judgment given by the Supreme Court of India has opened the floodgates to a massive nationwide conversation on how Indians view women, morality and the normalization of the inherently problematic ways in which we treat both. Whether it is addressing the stigma associated with menstruation, or the parallelism with the #MeToo movement, or taking on the broader aspect of institutionalized gender discrimination, Sabarimala has pulled its fair share of skeletons out of the closet.  However, has the seemingly straightforward verdict in Sabarimala paved the way for something even greater?

How Are We Looking After Our Grandparents?

Last year, I visited my mother’s relatives in New Jersey. Due to certain health problems, her aged aunt was dependent on oxygen cylinders. She moved from India because of the lack of facilities in the country. At first when I saw her, I felt sorry for her condition and wondered how difficult it was for her and the family. Nobody wants to live on a wheelchair. Nobody wants to carry a cylinder around...

Khatna and the Boundaries of the Female Body

India is divisively governed by its personal law. There are indeed very few boundaries the gospel truth of religious customs will not broach. And for as many ardent followers it fosters, it makes a proportionate number of sharp tongued critics. The Hon’ble Supreme Court of India is currently hearing the petition filed by Advocate Sunita Tiwari, praying for a blanket ban on the practice of female circumcision or khatna and further rendering it...

The Question of Public Space in a Democracy

Public spaces represent areas which are open and accessible to all people residing regardless of gender, age, race, and ethnicity. Public spaces represent familiarity, safety and accessibility. In India, though compromised in many respects, public spaces have lent themselves to the changing conversation on many occasions. For instance, Delhi University’s North Campus found its walls and footpaths painted with ‘Pinjra Tod’ for its namesake campaign which aimed at fighting against sexist college and hostel...

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